After the absence of some further details on Intel’s upcoming Coffee Lake mainstream CPU architecture (which is understandable, really, considering how the X299 platform and accompanying processors are all the rage these days), some new details have emerged. Intel’s Coffee Lake architecture will still be manufactured on the company’s 14 nm process, but is supposedly the last redoubt of the process, with Intel advancing to a 10 nm design with subsequent Cannon Lake.

The part in question is a six-core processor, which appears identified as a Genuine Intel CPU 0000 (so, an engineering sample.) SiSoft Sandra identifies the processor as a Kaby Lake-S part, which is probably because Coffee Lake processors aren’t yet supported. The details show us a 3.1 GHz base, and a 4.2 GHz boost clock, with a 256 Kb L2 cache per core and a total of 12 MB L3 (so, 2 MB per core, which is in-line with current Kaby Lake offerings.) The 6-core “Coffee Lake” silicon will be built on a highly-refined 14 nm node by Intel, with a die-size of 149 mm². Quad-core parts won’t be carved out of this silicon by disabling two cores, but rather be built on a smaller 126 mm² die.

 

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